Publishing … And Other Types Of Insanity

Between author web sites, blogs, publishing sites, information, literary magazines, genre websites, useful resource databases, and on-line writing newsletters and magazines, there are lots of web sites for writers. It would be troublesome to checklist all of them. Here are the sites I incessantly visit because they’ve published resources that I exploit for my very own nefarious purposes.

Some of these sites you in all probability will already learn about. Others are hidden gems, providing great resources for aspiring authors, as well as writing suggestions and insights from industry professionals and authors. Agent Query is the primary place you must look to find an agent. Their database means that you can seek for brokers by fiction style, nonfiction topic, by identify or by key phrase.

John Kremer is the e book advertising guru. Along with helpful advertising articles, his site has a TON of resources: Lists of a whole bunch of publishers by style, best impartial e-book publishers, mental property rights attorneys, publicity sources, internet advertising resources, it goes on without end. If you’re thinking of self-publishing, you want to go to this site.

Back when Duotrope was free, I spent a lot of time perusing the thousands (no exaggeration) of literary magazines in its database. Duotrope has the lot – journals of each genre, response rates and occasions, pascal, sort of publication (print, electronic), frequency of publication, whether or not they accept reprints, and so forth. Now, that Duotrope charges, I’m going to The Grinder for submission information.

But, if I want to take a look at a journal quickly I sort the title of the journal and “Duotrope” right into a Google search. You can sign up for a one-month free trial if you want to strive their site. If you are persistently submitting stories or poems to literary journals, I extremely recommend Duotrope.

Erika Dreifus is an author, reviewer, and “resource maven.” Every Monday she publishes a contemporary batch of no-fee writing contests, competitions, and requires submissions on her blog, Practicing Writing. Resources on her site embrace: A list of MFA applications, conferences, where to publish your work, grants and fellowships, awards, jobs for writers, and interviews with revealed authors. Mica Scotti Kole had an awesome idea. Why not put all of the free writing contests and occasions on a monthly calendar?

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Nothing could be more handy. In addition to her monthly checklist of contests, Mica has assembled a useful record of more than 80 agents who symbolize science fiction and fantasy. She also blogs about conferences she has attended, which may be very helpful if you’re planning to attend one. Get Published Weekly Roundup is a weekly weblog submit (Mondays) by Grad Student Freelancers that features new brokers, brokers altering companies, contests, and interviews. I’ve discovered their roundup very useful as a result of it comprises particulars not readily accessible on other websites. For a price, Grad Student Freelancers will compile a list of agents in your genre.

But in the event you go to Agent Query, you will discover brokers in your genre for free, and compile your personal listing. It simply takes just a little extra work. When Duotrope decided to start charging, up sprang the submission Grinder. Essentially, the Grinder does the whole lot Duotrope does. Jae runs one of the best websites on writing I have discovered. Every facet of writing is lined, from plot construction to characterization, to pace and point of view.

She additionally talks concerning the nitty gritty – grammar factors, sentence construction, and phrase selection. Jae delves into the practical issues as nicely, hiring an editor, how much you should pay for one, the difference between beta readers and critique partners. All in all, Jae does an excellent job of explaining the nuts and bolts of writing in clear, concise language. Jane Friedman is the Wonder Woman of publishing.